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I have an 82 1100 with only 31k on the engine. All services preformed by previous owners. Always stored indoors. Just purchased this spring. My first Goldwing. Last 1.5 k my riding.
The man I purchased it from told me that it was very cold blooded. It does take quite a while to warm up before driving if it's been sitting for a while. There is a soft spot when you first begin to turn the throttle from idle where the bike wants to quit. If you wiggle the throttle and get the RPMs up and ease it back off before opening the clutch you can get it to go. but if you try to just open the clutch and add throttle she kills every time until it's warmed up.
I can live with that because once it's warmed up it runs like a champ. but I am curious whether this is a common phenomenon or if perhaps there's something I should look into. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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VERY common on the older Wings.
 

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Hey Indignant - As Cantankerous mentioned, most of the 4 cylinder GW's are cold blooded. On all the early GW's I've owned - I simply found that you 1) set the choke to get her started 2) back the choke off a bit 3) once you can rev the engine with no drop in RPM, begin riding while watching the temp gauge 4) once the temp gauge indicates that she is up to normal operating temp, the choke should be completely off. Naturally - this procedure is assuming your carbs are all clean, synched and working properly.

Although my current 84 GW has had the carbs rebuilt, fitted with 87 model jets and kept well synched - it can still be pretty ornery in the mountains on cool mornings.

Ride Safe - Michael
 

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Hey, thanks all

I am really stoked about this new machine. I love everything about it, and I love finding out about all things Goldwing.
Someday, when I grow up I may even get my hands on one that was built in this century. I tell my friends, "It's not a motorcycle, it's a car engine squeezed between two wheels."

Your advice is in line with my thoughts, and I consider this all part of the charm of riding an older machine. Just wanted to check to make sure that there wasn't something I was overlooking. I want my girl to look and run better than the day I bought it, always.

I noticed that during startup that #3 Cylinder warms slower than the others. Is this due to the location of the fuel pump, perhaps? Just wondering...
 

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Hey, thanks all

I am really stoked about this new machine. I love everything about it, and I love finding out about all things Goldwing.
Someday, when I grow up I may even get my hands on one that was built in this century. I tell my friends, "It's not a motorcycle, it's a car engine squeezed between two wheels."

Your advice is in line with my thoughts, and I consider this all part of the charm of riding an older machine. Just wanted to check to make sure that there wasn't something I was overlooking. I want my girl to look and run better than the day I bought it, always.

I noticed that during startup that #3 Cylinder warms slower than the others. Is this due to the location of the fuel pump, perhaps? Just wondering...
Maybe check that plug see if it is firing that would cause the faltering and the slow warm up .. maybe it is not firing until it gets warm ,,
 

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Thanks kgee, that's a good idea. Although I would think that I could tell if 1 of 4 cylinders was not firing, I have found that logic and complex machines are not always in harmony. So, I will check that...
 

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I noticed that during startup that #3 Cylinder warms slower than the others. Is this due to the location of the fuel pump, perhaps? Just wondering...
Curious as to how/why you check the cylinders for warmth during startup? I've got an '83 Interstate which is very cold blooded.
 

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My Gl1200, '86 model would sputter on take off... often would die. had to rev the engine and slip the clutch.Was a real problem especially when the forks were turned. Dumped me several times. Or, when trying to do a tight turn around. Felt real stupid. After some research, I figured the low rpm carb jet(s) were the problem. At lolleast I could blame the bike now. Pulled the carbs, cleaned and replaced the jets. Now I have no excuse, but, haven't taken a spill, yet. The project create a lot of new strings of profanity as they really wedged the carbs and plenum box in the cavity. She ran like a top until the head gaskets blew.
Good luck.
 

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The mid 80's were bad at being cold blooded mainly due to the federal mandated emission regulations, they run very !ean no matter the brand. Best and easiest fix is to let it warm up more as the weather cools. Before you ride try bliping the throttle and see if there is any hesitation, if there isn't ride and if there is warm a little more.
 
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