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It might be a bit different for each model run of Wing, and there are some items to remove to get access to the bleed valve but it goes like this (for hand bleeding, not with a Mighty-vac or such):
To drain:
wrap the area around the reservoir with a rag(s) to prevent any spilled fluid getting on the nearby parts (corrosive). Turn handlebars right to level the reservoir and remove the screws, cover and diaphram. Coonect a bleed hose to the bleed valve of the slave cylinder. Loosen the bleed valve and pump the lever until no fluid comes out of the tube.
Refill the reservoir to the casting ledge inside the reservoir with the appropriate fluid (1800's use DOT 4, and I believe the others do too)
To bleed once refilled:
Squeeze the lever until pressure is felt.
Squeeze the clutch lever and then open the bleed valve about 1/4 turn (hose still attached) and then close it.
Release the lever slowly and wait a few seconds after the lever is fully extended out.
Repeat this process until no air bubbles appear in the bleed hose. Remember to close the valve completely when finished, torque to 6.6lb/ft.
Be sure to top up the reservoir to the casting line, install the diaphram, cap and tighten the two screws (1.1 lb/ft)

If I've made any omissions or step errors hopefully someone else will chime in on this and make the corrections
 

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Only thing I would add is not to let the reservoir get completely empty. You do not want to suck air into the system.
I usually draw the old fluid out of the reservoir and fill with fresh before I start. Clean fresh stuff going in right from the get go.
 

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you can just do a gravity bleed. turn the bars so the master cylinder is level. be sure to keep the reservoir full. crack the bleeder valve and allow it to drip. you may need to use a piece of hose so the fluid does not corrode anything. after you have a steady drip, close the valve and test the clutch. I would work the clutch a bit then reopen the bleeder valve to drip a bit more just to make sure all air is out, ya should be good to go
 

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K.D. never tried this method on a bike but maybe I will someday.

Get a container say 1/2 full of fluid (a old bottle of the same fluid works great) have the hose in the bottle under the fluid level. Open Bleeder, slowly pump handle/pedal til fliud starts to flow & air bubbles stop. This method works. I used to bleed the brakes on the race car by myself using it. The key is the hose below the fluid level will not allow air in & as long as you keep adding fluid to the resevoir no air can get in that way. You can actually change the fluid in the entire system doing it that way & never have to shut the bleeder. It works at least on the race car. As I said I will have to try it on the Bike sometime unless you do 1st.;):D
 

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fossil92 I like that idea, i am going to have to try it next chance i get.
It truly works great. Takes a little practice & if you let either end get any air you will find yourself saying things like @#%* and +!~$ and then you just have to start over.:D
 
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