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Discussion Starter #1
I have an 86 goldwing with 35,000 miles, and recently discovered that it is no longer charging. I was out on a ride when it decided to quit, luckily a short distance from home. I charged the battery back up to 12.6 volts, then started the bike and discovered that I was only getting 11.8 volts back to the battery, even at higher rpm's. I have heard that these models have had some issues with the stator. I would really appreciate any info and or things to test in hopes to fix this issue. I also noticed that the connector that is located next to the battery ( 4wires ) got hot and melted the plastic that surrounds the wires, another issue with these models, the melted connector has been this way since I have owned the bike, since spring of "08" Thanks.
 

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Welcome to the forum from Pennsylvania. Sorry I missed your first post a while back. Sounds like you have the "dreaded" stator problem. I've never owned a 1200 so I'm not much help with your problem. I'm sure someone with a 1200 will chime in here shortly with some help. Ride safe..
 

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If you noticed the melted connector in spring of 08 you should of corrected the problem then. You might try bypassing the connector and see if that helps the charging but I would say you are ready for a stator, It's about $1,000 repair, the motor has to come out to change it. Good luck.
 

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Hey Joe, thanks for the dreaded answer that I was afraid of hearing but expecting none the less. I did a ohm resistence test on the three stator leads that were located next to the battery and determined that there was no resistence between any combination of the leads. Can I bypass the 4 wire connector by simply cutting the melted plug connectors and hard wire it back together? What test can I perform on the stator leads going into the voltage regulator to maybe get a better idea where I stand on determining the status of the stator. Yes, I have heard about the process of replacing the stator, not one of Hondas better designs, that is why I really want to make sure that it is the stator. thanks for the help, I appreciate it very much.
 

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Yes you can and should cut out the 4 pin plug and hard wire the connections, but before you, the soldering, check that you have continuity between all 3 alternator wires and no continuity between earth and any of the 3 alternator leads.. This is just a basic check that the stator is still functional. It would be a shame to solder it all in and then find the stator was damaged!!

Gary
 

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I did a ohm resistence test on the three stator leads that were located next to the battery and determined that there was no resistence between any combination of the leads.




You should have a reading on every combination of the three wires. They should all be close, within a few ohms of each other.
 

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It was not clear to me where he actually measured those resistance values (sounded like the input to the regulator, so after the 4 pin plug), I would strongly recomend cutting the 4 pin plug out and checking the resistance values at the wire ends, the 4 pin plug could be your cause of the open circuit.. If you get open circuit at the wires (after cutting off the 4 pin plug) then the stator is dead.

Gary
 
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