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I don't know if this has anything to do with it but:

I had the displeasure of riding yesterday in a monsoon. Before yesterday, my brakes worked fine. Today, I have to squeeze with all my might to get stopped. The pads look fine, fluid levels look fine:confused::confused:

Any experience on this?
 

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OE Pads? Sounds like they got cooked.

I did 7 hours in a torrential downpour in Northern Cal last year, no adverse effects.

One interesting thing I have noticed on the brakes, I need new pads, but only the rear and left front. Right front looks fine. ???


I don't know if this has anything to do with it but:

I had the displeasure of riding yesterday in a monsoon. Before yesterday, my brakes worked fine. Today, I have to squeeze with all my might to get stopped. The pads look fine, fluid levels look fine:confused::confused:

Any experience on this?
 

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OE Pads? Sounds like they got cooked.

I did 7 hours in a torrential downpour in Northern Cal last year, no adverse effects.

One interesting thing I have noticed on the brakes, I need new pads, but only the rear and left front. Right front looks fine. ???
Just changed mine out a few week ago and found the same wear pattern. The three of us " shade tree mechanics " speculated that the wear pattern had something to do with the " linked brake system " as applying the rear brake puts an extra piston charge to the left front. I'm a heavy rear brake user so it made sense to us given our limited technical understanding at this point. We are learning as we go.
 

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I don't know if this has anything to do with it but:

I had the displeasure of riding yesterday in a monsoon. Before yesterday, my brakes worked fine. Today, I have to squeeze with all my might to get stopped. The pads look fine, fluid levels look fine:confused::confused:

Any experience on this?
Both the rear and the front brakes require " all your might " ?
 

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Discussion Starter #5

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We're thinking, we're thinking......... What do you " know " about the brakes, i.e., last time replaced ? serviced ? what brand of pads ? etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
This is what happens when you don't get maintenance record.
No idea when replaced or type of pads.
I do know that 8K miles ago a mechanic checked everything to be good.
 

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Great ! Since we know nothing about their history we can start our own. We are going to replace the rear pads first. Are you with me ?
 

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Great ! Since we know nothing about their history we can start our own. We are going to replace the rear pads first. Are you with me ?
Whoa!! Hold on there Lee!! If I were bringing down a pilotless plane, I would be all ears, but this is where I draw the line.:eek:

Changing my own oil is one thing.....this is insane!!

Its best that I turn this over to the pros.
 

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Just changed mine out a few week ago and found the same wear pattern. The three of us " shade tree mechanics " speculated that the wear pattern had something to do with the " linked brake system " as applying the rear brake puts an extra piston charge to the left front. I'm a heavy rear brake user so it made sense to us given our limited technical understanding at this point. We are learning as we go.
If I remember correctly the hand brake activat4es 2 of the 3 pistions on the right front and 1 of the left front and 0 in the rear. The foot brake activates 1 of the 3 pistions in the right front 2 of the 3 in the left front and all 3 pistions for the rear caliper. Therefore mostly using the foot brake would cause more wear in the left front caliper. This was what happened to me and I understand it is pretty common.
 

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If your brake pads look like they aren't worn, maybe all the wet weather coated your rotors with road oil. How about a nice can of Break Cleaner to dissolve off the surface oils from the rotors and pads. Then I suggest driving down the roadway and dragging both the front and rear brakes to heat them up a bit to burn off any remaining oils. After all this, try a full brake application and see how it goes. I also notice diminished brake feel after everything gets soaked for a while. If this doesn't help, you can move onto your next plan of attack.
 

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If I remember correctly the hand brake activat4es 2 of the 3 pistions on the right front and 1 of the left front and 0 in the rear. The foot brake activates 1 of the 3 pistions in the right front 2 of the 3 in the left front and all 3 pistions for the rear caliper. Therefore mostly using the foot brake would cause more wear in the left front caliper. This was what happened to me and I understand it is pretty common.
I can attest to that from first time experience changing the front brake pads and observations as far as my braking habits are concerned. It fits the expectation based on your sequence of force applied exactly. In short, I'm a right foot rider braker. No surprise here.
 

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Whoa!! Hold on there Lee!! If I were bringing down a pilotless plane, I would be all ears, but this is where I draw the line.:eek:

Changing my own oil is one thing.....this is insane!!

Its best that I turn this over to the pros.
You never need to know so much as when you have to TEACH . I like Dookoo's possible remedy. I have been contemplating your brake description all day and the thought of " stuff " lining or slicking the pads keep coming back in my mind. Hose them down with brake cleaner fluid. Careful on the over spray. Protect your rims, etc.
 

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Well, Red Ron was pretty close on the linked brake/piston activation.
"For the uninitiated a quick explanation of LBS. A second master cylinder and a three-stage proportional control valve (PCV) to couple the three-piston calipers of the dual-front and single-rear brake discs.

Using the front brake lever activates the outer two pistons of the front right-side caliper and the centre piston of the front left-side caliper and, acting through the secondary master cylinder and an inline proportioning valve, the outer two pistons of the rear caliper.

The rear brake pedal operates the centre piston of the rear brake caliper, the centre piston of the front right-side brake caliper and the outer two pistons of the front left-side caliper. A delay valve sensitive to the rider's pedal pressure smoothes front brake engagement." ...MCNEWS
Couldn't have said it better meself:D
As to Ref's lack of 'whoa power', I'd have to agree with the cleaning idea, but not sure how you'd get the residue off the brake surfaces so that the wheels and tires didn't get some of that wonderful but nasty Brakleen on them. Use caution and lots of rags/towls during cleanup and test the brakes in a very secure closed area before venturing out into traffic. On another note, replacing pades isn't one of the more expensive jobs to have done in a shop by a trained tech;)
 

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My guy told me he would take the pads off and sand them a little. He thinks I crystalized the pads....when the hot water hit them. Gonna take it to him tomorrow.
 

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My guy told me he would take the pads off and sand them a little. He thinks I crystalized the pads....when the hot water hit them. Gonna take it to him tomorrow.
Will you be witnessing the pad removal and re-install ? Better take notes as there will be a test on Tuesday. Ruff'em up REF.
 

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Whoa!! Hold on there Lee!! If I were bringing down a pilotless plane, I would be all ears, but this is where I draw the line.:eek:

Changing my own oil is one thing.....this is insane!!

Its best that I turn this over to the pros.
I bought my Wing used; had an insp sticker from the prev month, yet I chad to change out the rear pads after less than 1000 mi later. A good mech can look at the pads while they're on the bike and tell you if they need changing, but getting them changed is sound advice.
 

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Never have that problem in Cape Breton because we don't get any rain here in the Northeast but am interested now in how these brakes work. I just pull or step on the pedal and I come to a stop. Never knew about all these different pistons but am interested in how often we should change our pads. Good luck with finding your solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
UPDATE
As promised here is the update on my brakes.
1. Replaced the rear brakes
2. Fluids were the main problem. When I was pulling the brakes the fluid wasn't compressing....Bled lines and replaced all Fluids...even the clutch.
3. Used some 30 grit sand paper and did a light sand on the front pads since they had been crystalized by the hot water.
RESULTS
Brakes are perfect - very smooth.:):):)
 

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Good news Efinref. However, I don't see the relationship between the brake fluid going bad (I.E. air bubbles or dirty) and the sudden loss of brake feel due to wet weather. Sounds like the main culprit was the glazing/'crystalization' of the pads. Regardless, I'm glad to hear you are back on the road with good brakes.
 
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