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Most models of bikes it does wonders if you pump up the rear brake as hard as it gets, then set a weight on the brake pedal overnight to force the air bubbles to the highest point. Sometimes it works quite well and sometimes it has to be done several times. Eventually the bubbles work their way out doing this. PITA!!!
 

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not sure about the 1100
but the 15 and 1800s tend to not like the vacuum bleeder, never seems to get all the air
it take the old pump 'em up version, a speed bleeder seems to make much easier work of it
that was the only way I finally got my 1500 to ever work correctly
 

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Rebuilt both front calipers got a new master and replaced all brake hoses bleed with a vacuum bleeder done it by hand but front brakes are hanging up and still squishy plz help
What do you mean by hanging up? Pads rubbing on the rotors? Or pistons not moving upon lever actuation? A soft lever means the there is still air in the system. Try pressure bleeding the system instead of vacuum. Is everything tight? No leaks anywhere? Don’t forget to bleed the rear while bleeding the rest of the system.
 

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2021 Goldwing Bagger, 2007 GasGas EC300
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Are you sure the rubber seals on the pistons are in correctly? There is a taper on the inside edge of the seal which has to be put in correctly or the pistons will not release correctly. The manual tells you which direction they need to go. (been a few years since I did my race bikes, so I can't remember which direction the taper goes.)
 

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Are you sure the rubber seals on the pistons are in correctly? There is a taper on the inside edge of the seal which has to be put in correctly or the pistons will not release correctly. The manual tells you which direction they need to go. (been a few years since I did my race bikes, so I can't remember which direction the taper goes.)
All caliper rebuild kits (that I’ve ordered/used) now come with square cut o-rings to allow the seal to pull back the piston ever so slightly. Those taper cut seals you speak of were race stuff that I think was the hot setup in dirt bikes of the era. That went back there a ways.
 

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2021 Goldwing Bagger, 2007 GasGas EC300
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All caliper rebuild kits (that I’ve ordered/used) now come with square cut o-rings to allow the seal to pull back the piston ever so slightly. Those taper cut seals you speak of were race stuff that I think was the hot setup in dirt bikes of the era. That went back there a ways.
The last kit I did was for a Suzuki GSXR750 with Nissin brake calipers which had tapered edge on the seals. Unless you looked at them very closely, the kit I had looked like square edges but actually had a very slight taper. Not doubting what you have seen, just letting people know that the taper can be very slight and be missed.
 
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The last kit I did was for a Suzuki GSXR750 with Nissin brake calipers which had tapered edge on the seals. Unless you looked at them very closely, the kit I had looked like square edges but actually had a very slight taper. Not doubting what you have seen, just letting people know that the taper can be very slight and be missed.
You know what, you may be right about Suzuki, I had worked on one that ran coolant through the frame. We couldn’t figure out why it kept over heating. Seems, the previous owner put a highway bar on it and clamped/bolted it to the frame. The frame cracked and leaked. Suzuki is different. They must have used master cylinder cup seal theory. Now you can get replacement calipers and master cylinders cheaper/better/faster than finding rebuild kits.
 

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Speed bleeders!
Absolutely!
I've replaced every bleed valve on my 2013 GL1800 and replacing brake and clutch fluid has become child's play. Don't completely drain the fluid, rather suck out what's in the reservoir with a turkey baster, attach a hose to the bleed valve, unscrew a 1/4 turn, top off the reservoir and pull the lever or pump the pedal. Keep an eye on the draining fluid and the reservoir, making sure it doesn't empty during the process. Once the fluid comes out clean (there should be no bubbles anyway), close that valve, put the cap back on the reservoir and pull the lever or pump the pedal to pressurize the line.
 
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