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T.A.T Plans -

Hey KTM - You had mentioned wanting to spend some time traveling part of the coast to coast Trans-America Trail while in the states. You probably already know that the TAT is a loose assortment of rugged slow paced back roads typically used by the more dual sport inclined individuals.

Here is a Web Page kept up by a bunch of retired guys who posts lots of information and photos from their U.S. based motorcycle travels - including some sections of the TAT.

http://bigdogadventures.com/

Good Luck with your plans - Michael
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
I would agree you have a much better plan with 19" spoke wheels and tube tires, much easier to pack some extra tubes and patches than spare tires. Take a couple tire spoons and basic tools with a hand or foot pump and you can solve any flats you could possibly get yourself. Good luck and enjoy the ride.

If you are in Memphis Tennessee you will only be about 4 hours from the Mississippi crew and my garage if you need to do some maintenance, just so you know your options I live just outside Jackson MS.
Hi Warwgn , Thank you that is a very kind offer , hopefully I can at least call by for a 'Gday' ..,

.., yes I also have some good tyre tools from US company - Motion Pro on my shopping list and recently found they also sell them in Australia.
- Bead pro bead breaker lever set, https://www.motionpro.com/product/08-0519
- bead buddy II (acts as 3rd hand)
- valve stem remover
- tubeless plug kit (the ktm is tubeless spoked wheels)
- back up tubes (for ktm in case plugs fail) and for trailer + tube patches
- small electric pump + small hand pump (as a back up)

I will intend bomb proofing the bike for failures as much as possible after seeing issues arise on KTMs over the long haul.
Mainly issues originating from Dirty fuel , and a poor air box design that lets in dust.
Outback Australia and other developing nations have been known for dirty fuel.

I will be buying a great aftermarket Unifilter (air filter) , and will have dirty fuel protection by Goolgatech(from Italy https://guglatech.it/en/products/ktm/1290-super-adventure/MFPFKG ) who sell an excellent 3 stage fuel filtering kits that stops all crud getting into your fuel filter and injectors ,
My KTM will also has an optional onboard engine mapping to handle fuel as low as 80 RON (if needed)

Also I will have good crash bars and bash plate installed , and handlebar lever protection in case I drop the bike (which I am sure I will many times)
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
Hey KTM - You had mentioned wanting to spend some time traveling part of the coast to coast Trans-America Trail while in the states. You probably already know that the TAT is a loose assortment of rugged slow paced back roads typically used by the more dual sport inclined individuals.

Here is a Web Page kept up by a bunch of retired guys who posts lots of information and photos from their U.S. based motorcycle travels - including some sections of the TAT.

http://bigdogadventures.com/

Good Luck with your plans - Michael
Hi jkmcdonald , Cheers and thanks for the link .
Yes - The trail looks awesome , you Guys are so lucky to still have areas like this with the large population that you have , I hope you can save those areas for the generations to come . I have watched many you-tube videos on the trail and found lots of good info. I am not sure how current the info is as I am sure routes change often due to flooded sections, or other natural causes, or even track closures for various reasons .

This is the best link I have found so far for maps and info (not sure of their accuracy or how current they are :

http://www.transamtrail.com/
http://www.transamtrail.com/the-trans-am-trail/

I also have another map link here (need to find it again - forgot where I saved it) of maps sold by a guy named 'Kevin' which have many alternate routes for different riding levels . I do know a 250 dual trail bike is the best all round suited bike , and a big 1300cc adventure bike is least suited , but I want that bike as it will good for towing (away from the TAT) and its creature comforts (as you guys only appreciate too well) , plus I always look after my stuff and will be keeping that bike for many moons to come.

JKM , I also liked your camouflage / low key tips too in your other post .

.., After living in SE Asia the past 12 years, and travelling in remote places for 20 + years before that , I appreciate the importance of your comments. On thing I will have is an old lightweight dirty black bike cover , and one for the trailer also , as anything covered almost makes a bike invisible to opportunist thieves as opposed to a big glaringly larger bike loaded with luggage . The covers also help create a better stealthiness when wild camping and also hide the reflectivity (which my trailer will have lots of for road safety due to its low height .

Another thought I had (along with the 'CAMO' topic you mentioned) - was to have my bike covered in that plastic 'wrap' they now have ..,

- Not only to protect the paintwork for the duration of the trip from dust , scratches etc ..,
(where I won't have access to the TLC we give out bikes at home with our supple of cleaning products etc we like keep at home).
- But also for the same reason you bought up - which to downgrade the look the bike 'look cheap', and I was thinking of matt black etc .., etc as an option .
 

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I have a small trailer that I pull behind my GL1800. I wanted to protect my trailer under side. So I had a shop spray the under side of the trailer with Rihno bed liner. It is tuff enough to hold up to the rocks and other debris that hits it. For the insurance thing my insurance covers the trailer. It is put in as an accessory to the bike. Make sure you have it covered for the full price and any other gear that you have with you. Good luck on your trip and be safe.
 

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Hey KTM - One other suggestion when it comes to keeping your bike clean while traveling on poorly maintained or unpaved muddy roads. During my trip up to Alaska there was a thick haul road muck that turned to concrete if ever allowed to dry on your bike. To significantly speed up it's removal at a car wash I kept a light coating of non-stick cooking oil sprayed on my motor-transmission when traveling through this goo. Some of the deepest ruts were after a heavy rain north of Moose Creek but there were several other contenders that had your ass with a good grip on the seat.

Of course non-stick cooking oil does come in a spray can but you can simply buy a cheap generic (light cooking oil or similar) product as a liquid and apply it using a Reusable/Refillable Multipurpose Aerosol Spray Bottle.

https://www.menards.com/main/tools-...s/reusable-spray-canister/p-1444421230460.htm


Good Luck, Michael
 

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Sorry to chime in late on the well wishes but obviously the gang has you pretty well versed with what they know. Keep tabs on the various areas that are dealing with poor economics and resulting political unrest. Sounds like one heckuv an adventure though!!
 
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