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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is there any members in the northern mass area who work on their own wings. i'd love some help with doing some repairs and restoration to my baby. as well as to learn how to do some maintenance on my own with the help of someone who is experienced.

id also like to learn what tools i need besides whats in the aspencade's tool kit
 

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Hi CharlaineC,
I am way to far away to help out with hands on as I am in Florida, however if your in need of tools I can point you in the right direction. Do you own any basic hand tools at all? if not a good place to start is Harbor Freight, they have very cheap tools not the best quality however I have never broke any of my harbor freight tools. some tools you need to have quality like screw drivers, wrenches, sockets, first off the machine you will be working on has many expensive parts on it and the last thing you want is a socket to break or slip while you are using it and damage the bike more than you are helping it. So with this in mind you will need mainly metric tools wrenches and sockets you will want 6 point and 12 point use the 6 point when ever possible as it is less likely to round off a bolt or nut.
you are going to need a 12 volt test light and a Digital volt ohm meter (DVOM)
most important you will need a well lit work area so invest in some shop lights.
low profile drain pan for oil and one for coolant, a shop manual for your bike is a must. Any job on your bike can be done with your two hands provided one of them is not a hook.:D
lets say you want to perform an oil change, a rear diff fluid change, and for the heck of it a tune up. so things you would want on hand, antisieze for the spark plugs dilectric compound for the spark plug wires, either a compressor or canned air to blow out the spark plug holes before the plugs are removed the manual will show you any o-rings and seals you would need for example I never change the oil or any fluid on my rides with out changing the drain plug seals. sure most of the time they are reusable but why risk it. you can buy cheep tools at first then once you upgrade over time to craftsman,Snap-on etc your old tools can be turned into specialty time saving tools if needed like a wrench that just wont fit on to a bolt can be bent ground down or otherwise modified to perform one specific task that may save many hours on a job.I have much more info to give you when you are ready let me know I have nothing but free time. if you would rather do this over the phone P.M me.
BTW most tools that you may need can be purchased at Autozone,Napa as a rental once your done with them clean them up and return them and they will give you your money back. if you cannot live with out the tool in your box just keep it.
 

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Hi CharlaineC,
Do you own any basic hand tools at all? if not a good place to start is Harbor Freight, they have very cheap tools not the best quality however I have never broke any of my harbor freight tools. some tools you need to have quality like screw drivers, wrenches, sockets, first off the machine you will be working on has many expensive parts on it and the last thing you want is a socket to break or slip while you are using it and damage the bike more than you are helping it. you can buy cheep tools at first then once you upgrade over time to craftsman,Snap-on etc your old tools can be turned into specialty time saving tools
Good advice, but I would suggest better tools than Harbor Freight, and for exactly the reason you mentioned.. HF tools, and other cheapie type tools are not manufactured to particularly exacting specifications. Craftsman makes acceptable tools, without the (extremely) high cost of Snap-On. Sears has sets of tools on sale all the time, and they run sales on individual tools too. Reasonably priced and guaranteed forever, they are a life-time investment. I still have and use tools that I bought 40 or more years ago. As long as you don't loose them, they are the last ones you will buy.

So back to tolerances...
"the machine you will be working on has many expensive parts on it and the last thing you want is a socket to break or slip while you are using it and damage the bike"
Having a wrench, socket, or hex key slip and booger up a fastener causes much more aggravation then saving a few bucks on the tool is worth. Professionals use Snap-On for a reason, and it isn't just that the tool-pusher stops by every week to give them their fix.. As a casual user, you don't need to spend that much, but it's worth looking around on Craigslist for used stuff. There is always a good listing of Snap-On stuff.
For hex keys, I would suggest Bondhus.. Very nice, pretty reasonable at Amazon..
http://www.amazon.com/Bondhus-13189-Balldriver-T-handles-2-10mm/dp/B00012Y38M/ref=sr_1_5?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1342272916&sr=1-5&keywords=bondhus+tools

100% yes on 6 point vs 12 point. Much less chance to booger up a nut or bolt.

So, buy good tools, and buy them once. It's much less expensive in the long run, and makes your life easier.

=Dave=
Old Dog Moto Works
 

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Let's face it the average person doing home improvement or DIY repairs Snap-on just is not in the budget. Craftsman is a good choice but don't turn your nose up so quick at HF I have for example long shaft metric and SAE Allen sockets that I bought from them and I have not broke or rounded off any fasteners and the tools still look new. The same set at Snap-on would be over $300 HF I spent like $14. This is also why I mentioned the tool rental program at most auto parts stores. You will get better than HF and you get to return them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I want thanknyou all for the tips and advice. once i'm in a more permanent location I plan on rebuying my tool collection. the reasion I am looking for help is that i'd like to learn from someone who is more experienced with wing repairs and maintenance then i am.
 

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One very important 'Tool' is a service manual. I suggest the Honda Factory Manual and you can get them from here: http://www.helminc.com/helm/welcome_select_oem.asp?Style=helm or you can use a Clymer service manual.
A good service manual makes a job easier.
Garage sales and Craigslist are a good place to find tools. Mechanics retire after many years and sell their tools off.
 
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