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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Corbin seat on the bike I just got. It has a tear along a seam anyway, but there really isn't much cushion and I like to have a lot. I took my last seat to an upholstery place in town and I spent a lot of money and didn't like the result. So this time I am going to try it myself because I really don't have the money this time to try and get it done again. So if there is anyone with experience in this that could give me some step by step tips on how to do it and what to use that would be great!
 

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My experience is that most artisans and folk that work with their hands in trades like upholstery are a bit close lipped about sharing their craft. I'd enlist the yellow pages and google and see if you can locate some local craftsmen ans just see if someone will do a bit of guidance with you. Someone may have a sympathetic ear.
 

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Of course, all-wise Budoka-san is correct. The folks who know "the craft of upholstery" keep it to themselves.

That said, it's not complicated. I checked my '85 Aspy and '83 GL1100 and both seat covers are stapled into what appears to be a plastic seat pan; either that or soft metal.:confused:

So, pretty easy to remove the seat cover by pulling the staples and then see what you have underneath. I imagine that what foam padding is there was glued to the seat pan. If you want to add to it (you need less thickness of higher density foam and your buns will feel better) you just buy a sheet of the density of foam you want to lay over it and cut it to basic shape. Glue it to the substrate foam or pan and finish this part by trimming the foam with a razor blade for shape and then a heat gun to really shape it in. The cover should still fit unless you put a stack of dense foam on the seat. If so, you'll just have to customize the seat cover a bit with the help of a person who knows their way around a sewing machine. You can match the color of the existing seat or put a custom "skirt piece" on the existing cover to lengthen it a bit so that you can wrap it around the edge of the seat pan at least 1" including a fold-over for the staple or rivet to go through.

I prefer pop rivets and washers to staples, but whatever. Center the seat cover side-to-side and front-to-back and put one staple or rivet in the front, then one in the back with minimal slack (just enough to fit it to the seat snugly in the middle), then tack it on each side of the middle of the pan to pull it snug. Then work your way around the seat pan securing it in multiple points. I basically use a torque pattern (upper left, lower right, upper right, lower left) and haven't had any problems with the stuff. Good luck!
 

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i wouldn't say a corbin seat has no padding but what corbin seats do have is firm padding
 

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Liquid Stitch -

Hey Magna - Naturally for professional results take it to a professional. But as far as the split is concerned - I've used Liquid Stitch for years to repair all kinds of upholstery problems. Although a reasonable repair can be made by working through the damaged split as a short cut, you'll get the best results if you take the cover off the seat frame.

An overview of the process would be:
1. Obtain some of the same type seat material and cut yourself a long rectangle piece that will overlap the opening on all sides.

2. Clean the rectangle material with alcohol then brush a light film of Liquid Stitch on both the rectangle patch material and the under side of the original seat.

3. Turn the repair over so you can see the outside of the damaged area. You should keep the cut closed using a couple of needle/thread loops spaced along the length. The idea here is to keep the sides of the repair area as close together as possible during the curing period. As the repair sets up use a pocket knife to gently scrap the outside edges of the repair to remove ANY excess Liquid Stitch material. You might even use a little alcohol to keep the area clean because anything showing on the seat cover will be seen permanently.

4. After a couple of hours of set-up time Liquid Stitch will dry clear and hold the repair together as strong as the original seat material. Remove any needle and thread loops with a pair of small scissors and apply some conditioner for it to look like a new seat. This repair will not come apart and last for as long as you own the bike.

By the way - I buy my Liquid Stitch off of Ebay. The smallest can (4 oz) is more than enough for most any repair. Don't leave the top/brush applicator off for any length of time or the unused portion in the can will quickly become a handy door stop.

I don't guess you've considered just sitting on a large foam pillow ? :)

Good Luck, Michael
 
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