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Discussion Starter #1
Well, the left fork on my 2008 started to leak on a trip to Yosemite. I heard about the anti-dive causing undue pressure on the left side causing fork seals to blow. When I got home, I immediately ordered a disable washer from Wingstuff hoping that maybe I caught it in time and the seal is not damaged. Luckily for me, after the 5 minute install, the leaking stopped and I am without anti-dive anymore. The bike dives a bit more (hardly noticable) but nothing which upsets the handling or causes an unsafe condition. I was a doubter about disabling the anti-dive, but now I see the light. Eventually, I plan on higher rate springs front and rear.
 

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1. If the ADV is working properly, there should be no problems
That opinion is not shared by very many!
2. Higher rate springs in front=harsher ride
3. Rear spring is a preload only spring. Higher rate doesn't mean better ride will result either!
Try setting the rear preload on the max and give that a try for a while. You might just get a surprise. This is after removing all preload. Then start to increase preload and listen for the "load" to change the sound of the pump. If this happens at a reading above about 4 on the gage, you need to fill the pump!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
1. I too like the idea of anti-dive. I was all for it until my left fork seal began to weep heavily. That is when I put in the antidive disable washer and the leak stopped (cheap fix for sure). I notice that I have more travel in the forks while turning and braking simultaneously and they are more compliant.

2. I am seeking a higher rate to obtain a more controlled suspension movement. I haven't decided yet what spring rate to get front and rear and scan this site and others for a happy medium between compliance, comfort, and handling. The problem is that I am fully bottoming my forks and rear spring on even moderate rides. I can hear and feel them bottoming. I also use zip ties on my suspension to guage how much travel I am using. It is obvious that I am undersprung for my type of riding. We don't have the best maintained roadways where I live and they are littered with repairs, potholes, and undulations. I just want a spring rate which will not bottom out as this situation can easily overload a front tire (I.E. a G-out midturn) leading to an unsafe condition. I'm just too lazy at the moment to remove my suspension components to work on them as the bike only has 11k miles.

3. My preload is set at 22 solo/25 with passenger as I found this to be the best setting for my preferences to how the Wing handles. Too low a setting and my front end feel is vague. Too high and the rear seems unplanted. I have yet to top out the hydraulic fluid in my preload but there is immediate movement of my suspension from the #2 postion.

But a stock Wing is an amazing bike regardless for almost any type of riding. I just want it to make it a better fit for me without spending too much.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Any suggestions on spring rate Chopin? Or do you not want to step in that bucket of goo!
 

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Any suggestions on spring rate Chopin? Or do you not want to step in that bucket of goo!
I don't know. They are the talk of the town elsewhere. My local riding bud just had them installed in Texas on his way across the continent . Mike had Progressive Springs, anti-dive disabled, Centramatic wheel balance disks, and some chrome rims just to make it all look nice. I have no technical info on them.
 

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Update on Progressive springs. They don't appear to come in different tension ratings. Mike purchased his set from Wingstuff and they only come in one flavor. Note: Progressive springs are for the front forks only.
 

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Budget minded upgrade as mentioned: Progerssive springs. The full meal deal is Traxxion but at a substantial $$ penalty, is crap and it does disable the anti-dive.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I've mentioned my feelings on Expensive Suspension Systems before. I truly do not believe that we need $4k plus suspensions unless we are trying to take tenths off our track times because that is only what you will gain in real life. The other 90+ percent is rider capability. I spend about $5k on suspension upgrades for my track bikes but to do that for the Wing would be overkill. For any motorcycle suspension to work correctly, the fork and spring need to be at proper 'sag' with the end result of balance between suspension travel and droop/drop. Race Tech and Traxxion have their own formulas for spring rates depending on the weight of the bike and rider weight. I will most likely follow these guidlines. In the end, I hope to just purchase springs front and rear for around $250 total and have a well balanced suspension that won't bottom out or be too stiff.

My original post was about anti-dive and fork seals leaking. It was a $20 dollar fix to disable the antidive and it saved me a trip to the shop. Hopefully someone else can benefit from my experience and save themselves from the same. Honestly, the Wing performs better with the antidive disabled as it lets the front suspension soak up bumps while the brakes are activated. Just my feedback.
 

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My original post was about anti-dive and fork seals leaking. It was a $20 dollar fix to disable the antidive and it saved me a trip to the shop. Hopefully someone else can benefit from my experience and save themselves from the same. Honestly, the Wing performs better with the antidive disabled as it lets the front suspension soak up bumps while the brakes are activated. Just my feedback.
Good info Dookoo. Hopefully that feedback will help someone else. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Drilled a 1/4 in. hole in a nickel a couple of years ago and placed between the 2 halves. Don't think I would ever want to go back to the way it rode before.
 

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I just got a neat tool from Sealmate; It's a thin piece of plastic with a sort of hook on one end..hard to describe, anyway..it cleans dirt buildup from your fork seals and stops them from leaking! I haven't used it yet,but, it looks promising.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The plastic tool is calld SealSaver and I use it on my motoicross bikes. They work well to remove the small grains of dirt and debris that may get past and around the fork seals. It won't, however, prevent blown fork seals as a result of the anti-dive system on the left fork.
 

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How hard & what all is involved in the anti dive fix?
Interested - new bike, but if I can prevent a problem in the future with a little work now.....
(Witness first accessory: Louvered belly pan)
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
It is so easy to disable the antidive. I just ordered the antidive disable spacer from Wingstuff for $20. Got it in three days. The install took 10 minutes with no bruised knuckles, just the one on my head from my wife discovering that 'another' box had arrived from Santa.

1. Remove front fender (4 screws)
2. Remove left front plastic-chrome brake cover (2 screws)
3. Take off the two screws on the antidive unit
4. Install the antidive spacer (spaces plunger away to prevent actuating).
5. Reinstall everything.

Go for a ride to familiarize yourself with how the handling has changed. The front end will dive more with the application of front brake. The front end will feel more supple over most surfaces. It will be easier to bottom out the front forks upon very hard front brake application. You will have a silly grin of satisfaction on your face.

Have fun and Stay safe out there all!
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I just got a neat tool from Sealmate; It's a thin piece of plastic with a sort of hook on one end..hard to describe, anyway..it cleans dirt buildup from your fork seals and stops them from leaking! I haven't used it yet,but, it looks promising.:)
The cheap man's method at the races involved using an old credit car (new if you're rich) and slide the corner of the card in between the fork and seal and move it around a bit to hopefully remove the object causing your forks to leak. It is very surprising how often this neat trick works. It also removes the object which if stuck between your fork sliders and seal will scratch and damage your forks. You won't damage the seal as it will flex out of the way and spring back on its own.
 

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Not sure if it's the same one I have, mine is a Sealmate. It's a LOT thinner than a credit card, is very flexible and can follow the shape of the tube. It has a sort of "hook" on it..I can't see how a credit card would be flexible enough to follow the curve of a fork tube. But, whatever works..it's all good!:)
 
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