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This fits firmly in the For What Ever It's Worth catagory. I had a conversation with one of the best overall mechanics I know today. He has been a police motorcycle mechanic since the mid 70's. We were talking about the surge problems many have reported with their wings. He thought it sounded like a lean fuel delivery issue. I told him about the answers from Honda about it being the computer "learning" the rider. He feld this is prossible but not probable. He thought one way around this was to disconnect the battery for a few minutes which would allow the computer to reset itself.
He said there have been some reports of surge issues with the ST 1300's. One fix some of the ST owners have found is a replacement fuel pressure regulator that raises the pressure in the fuel rails by about one pound. This will give a more consistent fuel deilvery and reduce surge. "Turbo-Tom" at Turbo City in Orange California apparently has a replacement fuel regulator.

Again, for what ever it's worth.
 

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A lot of surge issues are caused from lack of knowledge. I've seen ECM resets with the Honda HDS and the bike still surges for the tech. Battery disconnects also for ECM resets with the same results. Many times a bike set-up person at the dealership will bolt everything together on the wing, install the battery, fire it up and grab a handfull of throttle.... WRONG !! The Wing needs to be fired up and idle, without touching the throttle and ran until the cooling fans kick on... the ecm needs to read the coolant fan sensor !! Surge surge surge....
Oh yeah.... capacitors... when doing a battery ECM reset by disconnecting the cable, capacitors in the system kinda like to keep an electrical charge. This will not allow totally erasing the memory and basing out the ECM. Wanna know a trick ? With the positive battery cable disconnected, eather reach over and touch it to the ground battery cable or take a wire with alligator clips and touch the plus cable to the ground cable. This will discharge the capacitors. NOTE: DO NOT DO THIS WITH BOTH CABLES CONNECTED TO THE BATTERY !! TOUCH THE CABLES TOGETHER WITH ONE DISCONNECTED FROM THE BATTERY. This will discharge capacitors in the system and totally base out the ecm. Fire the Wing up after battery cable reconnect like I said above until the coolant fans cycle. Surge should be gone.
Just a little tip from a long time Honda tech... me
hahahaha... the bike learning the rider... my goodness, more like the rider learning the bike !

----- Gimpster -----
 

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Thanks Gimpster, a star you are! I got this from Stu at Wing World
Hi Daryl,
There are two types of idle surge that I'm aware of on the GL1800, mostly affecting 2001 to 2003 models, or any model that has had it's ECM replaced and the new one not correctly initialized. One type involves rhythmic surging with the throttle completely closed. The second type involves a 500 rpm surge, between 1200 and around 1700 rpm, as the throttle is held steady when reaching 1200 rpm or slightly higher. This second complaint is usually experienced as a rider attempts to ride at a steady, slow speed as when trolling through a parking lot looking for a parking space, and it's usually found on early models that underwent the "Product Improvement Campaign".

The closed-throttle surge can usually be eliminated by correctly initializing the bike's ECM. This is done by beginning with a stone cold engine. The technician should start the bike by pressing the start button, but it's important that the throttle twist grip not be disturbed either during the start or for the duration of the initialization process. He should allow the bike to idle till the cooling fans turn on - it may take a while, but be patient. Then turn off the engine by switching off the key. If the throttle is disturbed before the engine is switched off, the initialization process will not complete. Turn the key on again, then re-start the engine. This completes the process, and the surging should be gone.

Kind of like what you said too Gimpster. I hope this helps some of you out there with the surging especially you wing67 across the pond!
 

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Thanks Gimpster, a star you are! I got this from Stu at Wing World
Hi Daryl,
There are two types of idle surge that I'm aware of on the GL1800, mostly affecting 2001 to 2003 models, or any model that has had it's ECM replaced and the new one not correctly initialized. One type involves rhythmic surging with the throttle completely closed. The second type involves a 500 rpm surge, between 1200 and around 1700 rpm, as the throttle is held steady when reaching 1200 rpm or slightly higher. This second complaint is usually experienced as a rider attempts to ride at a steady, slow speed as when trolling through a parking lot looking for a parking space, and it's usually found on early models that underwent the "Product Improvement Campaign".

The closed-throttle surge can usually be eliminated by correctly initializing the bike's ECM. This is done by beginning with a stone cold engine. The technician should start the bike by pressing the start button, but it's important that the throttle twist grip not be disturbed either during the start or for the duration of the initialization process. He should allow the bike to idle till the cooling fans turn on - it may take a while, but be patient. Then turn off the engine by switching off the key. If the throttle is disturbed before the engine is switched off, the initialization process will not complete. Turn the key on again, then re-start the engine. This completes the process, and the surging should be gone.

Kind of like what you said too Gimpster. I hope this helps some of you out there with the surging especially you wing67 across the pond!
Wing world... excuse me but is that a magazine or a web site ? Dealer ? LOL, I lead a sheltered life in shops all day and night so I am not familiar with them. The only extention beyond his reply to you, that was not suggested that I do is discharging the capacitors as I outlined. Anybody take electronics in high school ? I remember charging capacitors in class and pitching them to buddies in the hallways, giving them a zolt ! Same with your home PC, if you get a bad virus that makes you take it down to the nuts... you can refire it all day long and it can still be there. Simply unplug the power supply adapter from the motherboard and plug it back in. Charged capacitors still keep the memory in the cpu unit. As I mentioned about new techs going wrong with an ECM reset with the Honda HDS. Many times issues will remain unresolved. I get pulled away from a job being senior tech at the dealership only to find nothing wrong with all the sensors in the bike. Resolved a lot of issues with battery cable removal and touching the positive and negative together like I mentioned in the other post to discharge capacitors that may be retaining control unit memories. It works on a lot of fuel injected models but is not always the cure. Keep me posted on the bike over seas. If I can help I sure will, my friend

----- Gimpster -----
 
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