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I just rode home from work last night (Boston - NH). It is a fifty mile commute. It started to rain lightly before I head out but it soon developed into a downpour.

It was tough going, mainly because of the lack of vision. I found it hard to see because of the rain for one thing. But, the other things were all lights, whether they were behind me, in front of me as well as the headlights from the other side of the highway or even street lights were blinding. Another dilema was my night glasses got fogged for more than half of the trip. I couldn't clear them up. Even when I lifted my chin up and tilted my head back. I also tried seperating them from my face but the rain got in and it felt like pebbles into my eyeballs. That was my first night out in the rain and I am not looking forward to another one anytime soon.

My question here is why is the light so blinding? I noticed a lot of glare coming off of the steets, from the light source, having the effect of expanding the light. But, there's got to be more to it than that.

Can one of you veterans of the road explain this phenomenon to me?
 

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I've experienced what you have described for a few years now. I didn't think anything was wrong until you brought it up. Welcome to the fifties. Anti-glare glasses might alleviate it a bit.
 

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What your describing is being caused by age according to my eye doctor. If your prescription is off just a small amount and astigmatism is in the formula, the flaring of lights becomes a problem. And the type of lights have a lot to do with it too. I wish they would outlaw those damn blue lights because they momentarily seem to blind me if I look directly at them. The lights refracted in the water droplets have a lot to do with it too. Don't know of a solution except to slow down and be more vigilant. Gettin old sucks.:eek:
 

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The best solution to that is a good ff helmet and visor. Then you need a pair of gloves that has a chamois or wiper patch on the index finger to wipe the droplets off. Refracted glare is a sad but unfortunate fact of life. Ride carefully!!!
 

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"Dear Readers,

If you need a nightlight to find your way to the kitchen for a midnight snack, or have difficulty seeing while driving in the evening, you may be suffering from a condition known as “night blindness.”

Unlike animals, human vision is generally not as keen at night. Cats, for instance, see well at night because they have more rods than cones in their retinas, unlike humans. (Rods are the receptors that the eye uses for nighttime vision.)...........

As the light dims, your pupils dilate (grow larger) to take in more light.

But your dilated pupils reduce your ability to change your focus between near and far objects, so if you are driving, say, you may be “blinded” by streetlights and oncoming headlights. Your pupils constrict to block out the lights, but once those have passed, they must dilate to readjust to the dark, making it difficult to see the road.

Unlike a cat’s, human pupils simply can’t adjust fast enough to keep up with the cycle of light and dark. One of the most common causes of night blindness is deterioration due to age. In the natural aging process, the eye lens becomes less clear and grows cloudy over time, making it difficult to see in dim light. It is estimated that seniors need up to 50% more light to see clearly."

http://www.rebuild-your-vision.com/2008/08/why-your-vision-gets-worse-at-night/
 

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Any time the subject about getting older comes up, I remember what my Grandmother said; "It's hell getting old". Which makes me think of three things.
1. It is the only time I ever heard her say a cuss word.
2. She was in her late 80's when she told me that.
3. It means I'm not near as tough as my Grandmother.
She was a farm wife and had her own garden that she took care of by herself until she was 80. It was over an acre and she would be out there every day working it. Her table still beats any meal I have ever had. If I didn't have thirds she would ask me what was wrong. I sure miss my Grandma.

Anyway, I also noticed my eyesight changing over the last 15 years. Night time is also getting harder and if it rains I try to find a place to shelter up if I can. Learn to live with it. There is only one permanent solution.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That age thing

Yeah, I guess you're right chopin114; I'm getting old. Hey, how did you know I was in my fifties...never mind.

Thank you guys for putting things into perspective for me. And it never occured to me...that age thing.

DonaldLL; I do need a light anytime I walk around through the house at night.

But still, I can drive the bike ok during the night in clear weather conditions. Light does bother me now come to think of it... a lot more than it use to I guess.
 

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I didn't " know " you were in your fifties, you just sounded like you were. The fifties are a turning point for most of us in some way or another. It is the best of times, it is the worst of times; it is the age of wisdom, it is the age of foolishness; it is the season of Light, it is the season of Darkness.
 

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It means I'm not near as tough as my Grandmother.
She was a farm wife and had her own garden that she took care of by herself until she was 80. It was over an acre and she would be out there every day working it. Her table still beats any meal I have ever had. If I didn't have thirds she would ask me what was wrong. I sure miss my Grandma.


I truly agree, crownfire. It sounds as though you are talking about my Grandmother.


She was definitely right, it is hell getting old. I have to say the last five years my eyesight has depleted significantly.
 

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Been there... done that.

I know what you are talking about. I have experienced that myself, and as you can attest - it's no picnic. The worst for me was during the day - twice on a trip last summer we experienced, driving, blinding, pouring, deluge kind of rain; the first on the interstate... and we quickly pulled over under a bridge; the second just outside a little town on a winding country road... that was really harrowing. I was down to twenty miles an hour with several cars on my tail... and I was praying for a place to pull off. The trouble was, every time I thought I saw a driveway... I was on it and not able to get stopped in time. I had rain in my eyes, on my glasses, on the face shield, and on the windshield.

This was on my 1600 roadstar and I would like to think it would be less of a problem on my new 'Wing... but from here on out I will always stop and wait it out if I suspect a gully washer is imminent. That was foolish of me and I thank God my wife and I made it through without mishap.

Oh, and I am going to get one of those little wipers you put on your thumb!
 

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Getting old truly does suck, but would we have the things we have if we were in our 20's I know I would not be riding my Wing.
 

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I'll admit that I have ridden at night and a few times in the driving rain. There is no need any longer, to many motels and hotels on every corner.

Good luck with your night riding!!!!!!! ;)
 

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I'll admit that I have ridden at night and a few times in the driving rain. There is no need any longer, to many motels and hotels on every corner.

Good luck with your night riding!!!!!!! ;)
Guess you've never ridden in West Texas where every corner can be 200 miles apart. Sometimes you have no choice in the matter. :rolleyes:
 
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