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Discussion Starter #1
Changing the oil yesterday I noticed a Phillips head sheet metal screw penetrating the tire about dead center in the valley tread where the wear bars are. I pulled it out and yes, she was a bleeder. I'm right in the middle of changing the oil so all I could do was let her leak until I finished. Knowing I had a Run-flat car tire took some of the panic out of the equation. Left the driveway with under 20 psi still in the tire and bee-lined up to Goodyear. Stuffed $15 dollars in the mechanic's pocket and drove away to ride on some errands. Checked the pressure later and still holding at 32 psi. Some mentioned a patch vs. a plug as a more comfort level of repair. I'm sticking with the plug until further notice as my " comfort " level is greatly influenced by my " convenience " level.
 

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I'm hoping it was the kind that look like a little Mushroom. They can't work their way out.
The plugs that look like heavey black string can work their way out. Anyway that's what I've been told.
Wait you plugged a tire on a Motorcycle,:eek: Haven't you heard about the safety issues. No wait you plugged a car tire on a motorcyle !!!!:eek::eek: You have gone over the top and are started down the other side. :D:D
Ride safe
 

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I wondered where that screw got to I dropped in your driveway.:rolleyes:


Some mentioned a patch vs. a plug as a more comfort level of repair. I'm sticking with the plug until further notice as my " comfort " level is greatly influenced by my " convenience " level.
My only comment would be if there are steel belts in the tire, I believe I heard once that you shouldn't plug a tire with steel belts as the plug could be comprimised over time.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Well, Ron: Someone must sacrifice themselves for the betterment and/or detriment to others. And what a coincidence. I have an HVAC fellow over yesterday and find a sheet metal looking screw in my tire. Strange, very strange. I've had more than one stringy plug in my van tires from time to time and the tire went to its grave with the stringy plug still in it.
 

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I think you did the right thing. I have plugged several motorcycle tires and "rode them like I stole them". The plug lasted till the tire wore out in all cases. I wouldn't hesitate to plug the CT that I have on now. I have heard a few bad things about the mushrooms and I will stick with the reliable sticky ropes.
 

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Yep, plugging and patching works for me. I never understood the logic of throwing away a perfectly good tire, MT or CT, just because of a little hole. Living in an area with nails and screws littering the roadways, I've run plugs and patches for decades in every flat tire with no ill effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yep, plugging and patching works for me. I never understood the logic of throwing away a perfectly good tire, MT or CT, just because of a little hole. Living in an area with nails and screws littering the roadways, I've run plugs and patches for decades in every flat tire with no ill effect.
My experience here with numerous car tires over the years. Ok, it's a motorcycle, but it is still a car tire on a motorcycle. The tire was plugged, not the motorcycle. Pressure vigilance watch will increase, however; but everything has a price to pay.
 

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I've had some so so experiences in the past with plunging mc tires. A bunch of us were in Pa a couple of weeks ago, and one guy got a flat going down one of the runs (twistys). At the bottom I helped him plug it with a mushroom style plug. It lasted him all the way home to Canada to replace. The tire was down to the belts and didn't look to healthy when we where plugging it. My attitude is in the cage no problem, on the mc get me home and I will replace the tire.
 

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Necessity often dictates the current outcome of a situation. I'd rather replace than repair a tire, but what choice have you when you're stuck in the boonies /middle of nowhere?:eek:
 

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In an earlier post "New Darkside Dude" he showed a picture of his new Run Flat Car Tire. It had a label on it and it read in part. " Do not re-inflate after Run-Flat operation and do not repair". I posed a question about whether or not this was an economical trade. I think you poo poo'd my question but now I wonder if you have read the fine print. You used your tire in the Run Flat Operation and you patched it. Shouldn't you have replaced the tire as the label said and does that fact concern you about the safety of the tire from this time forward? Not criticizing or trying to tick you off but I just would like to hear your rationale for not replacing the tire as I have looked at several Run Flat tires since then and they all have that statement on their labels.
 

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never had a flat on the wing or the 450 to have to use a plug and all the other bikes use a tube
 

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I'm hoping it was the kind that look like a little Mushroom. They can't work their way out.
The plugs that look like heavey black string can work their way out. Anyway that's what I've been told.
Ride safe
I suppose its a matter of opinion on plug vs. string. They make string plugs that are for both bias and steel belt tires. The secret to making them stay put is to simply douse the string with the rubber cement just prior to insertion. Then use a razor blade or sharp knife to cut the excess off. This should all be done when there is air in the tire. Yes, you will lose some air when you ream the hole but leave that in until you are ready to insert the string. I plugged my 1800 rear tire and drove it another 2 thousand miles and when we took it off to replace it, the string wore just as the rubber had. Once it is inserted (wet) and its dry, you cannot pull it out. I wouldn't be at all worried about plugging my M/C tire and continuing on.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
In an earlier post "New Darkside Dude" he showed a picture of his new Run Flat Car Tire. It had a label on it and it read in part. " Do not re-inflate after Run-Flat operation and do not repair". I posed a question about whether or not this was an economical trade. I think you poo poo'd my question but now I wonder if you have read the fine print. You used your tire in the Run Flat Operation and you patched it. Shouldn't you have replaced the tire as the label said and does that fact concern you about the safety of the tire from this time forward? Not criticizing or trying to tick you off but I just would like to hear your rationale for not replacing the tire as I have looked at several Run Flat tires since then and they all have that statement on their labels.
Issac: I never read the " fine " print on any item. That is for the lawyers to read and make a case for or against from. I'm willfully running on a plugged run-flat tire and the onus is on me. My rational is this: I have run on numerous " plugged " car tires on cars / work vans and never given it a second thought. A run flat tire is not a different beast from a non run flat tire except in the strength of its sidewall: ergo, all tires should , and probably do, carry the same warning label ( liable label ). My history with plug tires just doesn't warrant instant replacing. I checked the tire pressure on the bike today after sitting for 48 hours and it is still within the expected pressure range. Would I like a new tire ? Sure! Who wouldn't ? Do I need a new tire now ? Therein lies the question. Time and the extra vigilance needed to monitor and worry will tell. I had a recent bad luck with a penetration on a still very usable and roadworthy front tire. I'm not just going to cave in and throw away a very new tire this time.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
I suppose its a matter of opinion on plug vs. string. They make string plugs that are for both bias and steel belt tires. The secret to making them stay put is to simply douse the string with the rubber cement just prior to insertion. Then use a razor blade or sharp knife to cut the excess off. This should all be done when there is air in the tire. Yes, you will lose some air when you ream the hole but leave that in until you are ready to insert the string. I plugged my 1800 rear tire and drove it another 2 thousand miles and when we took it off to replace it, the string wore just as the rubber had. Once it is inserted (wet) and its dry, you cannot pull it out. I wouldn't be at all worried about plugging my M/C tire and continuing on.
P.S. The mech who plugged my tire used the stringy thing. It was all gooey and rather long. He didn't hesitate to do it and when he was done said, " There you go ". No caveats, no warnings, no nada. I like blunt confidence expressed from others, it's contagious.
 

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It's all fine with me. I was just asking.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #18
It's all fine with me. I was just asking.:)
It's good to ask others for their reasons and justification. If their explanation and reasons read plausible and coherent you have to assume, until proven wrong, that you are not conversing with a complete lunatic. I've had two punctured tires in a relatively short time span on this bike and frankly " I'm mad as hell and I'm not going to take it any more!!!!!!! ".;)
 

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I have known they sticky rope type of plugs to be used on the sidewall of a car tire and they worked for over 10,000 miles.
I know, it's not a motorcycle, you shouldn't plug a sidewall, yada yada yada........
Sometimes a person just doesn't have the funds to buy new tires, she only paid $300.00 for the car!
 

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My friends son drove across the desert riding from Arizona to Boston got a flat ,used a plug in his rear tire. The heat expanded the tire and spit it out. He only had to stop 2 more times to replace it. For cars plugs ok, motorcycle that scares me .Blow out at 80mph is not fun on a motorcycle. Replace tire for piece of mind. My 2 cents
 
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