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Discussion Starter #1
Ok heres the deal. Since I got the wing 85 limited edition ive been told by several guys that own the 1200 series that they have 200,000 plus miles on their bikes on the original stator. My friends 84 interstate went out at 45 thousand and we put an alternator conversion on it. I know of several with the same problem and that the stator was an issue.
But these 200,000 plus mile stator guys are guys I know that wouldnt lie to me about it I dont think. They all hard wired their bikes and dont run extra lights etc kept them pretty much stock lighting. A few run GPS etc but thats it.
Im torn between doing the conversion before the stator goes kaplooy since its not that big a deal to do or just keeping the bike pretty much as is except for hard wiring the weak plugs and fuses and going with it since its charging exactly like it should. Mind you its an 85 that everything and I mean everything down to the last light bulb works perfectly on. Is it impossible that the stator can actually last on some of these bikes???
Im kind of a if it aint broke dont fix it kind of guy and bugs me to tear into to something thats working all these years like it came off the show room floor. It had one regulator put on it a few months ago and was hard wired as far as I can tell then.
You guys know more about these bikes then me, ever hear of one that actually ran out its life without losing a stator?? Thanks guys Ghost
 

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my 1200a had 42,500 miles on it when i got it and the stator had been changed. if it goes out again i'll do the conversion but it ain't broke so ...
 

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It really depends on what kind of riding you're planning on doing. If you mostly stay around town, it's probably not a huge deal if it dies on you someday, and I'd say if it ain't broke, don't fix it. If you're doing long-distance touring, well, it ain't no fun having the stator go when you're 400 miles from home, and I speak from experience. (Thank God my wife wasn't with me at the time!). If you're going on tours, it might be worth the peace of mind to do the conversion so you don't have to worry about it.
 

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Those 200,000 miles guys, have they owned the bike since it was new? I doubt very much if there is more than a couple that have gone that far without any problems. Not that it is impossible but very unlikely. Even the 1500 Wings needs brushes at about 80,000 miles. If you plan to take your bike out of town, change the stator, mine went out at about 45,000 miles on my 85. I just made a deal on a new 92 Gold Wing and while riding my 85 home the stator went out, you never know when it will happen but it will.
 

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Ghost, the stators in the LE's were actually heavier duty than the other 1200 models. My '84 1200I went through three of the darn things in +160,000 miles, which actually isn't bad. There was no conversion around at that time, but the last stator I put in was one of the heavier upgrades. I put a voltmeter on it after the first one went, and while it doesn't stop it from happening, it does give you a heads up if the voltage your bike is putting out drops.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
the 85 has a voltmeter built in so I can see what the voltage is at a glance. runs 14.4 most of the time unless im running the tape deck cb etc then it will pull down to 13.8 to 14 depending on how much stuff is turned on. Turn it off and it takes the battery right back up to 14.4.
We will be going Ky to texas just went to smokey mountains etc.
Ive got backup as the guys i ride with should I break no matter where one of them would bring a trailer and come get us and the bike ( ah brotherhood :D ). Have done that a time or two on my Harley.

Considering pulling the engine and the hassle of putting in a new stator that could go as well Id only go with the alternator conversion. Its cheap, easy and if the alt goes so what can get one fixed about anywhere.
Maybe Ill just change the thing out before spring to alternator even if it hasnt gone yet. Thanks Ghost
 

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Simple Electrical glitch

my 1200a had 42,500 miles on it when i got it and the stator had been changed. if it goes out again i'll do the conversion but it ain't broke so ...
Corrosion is always a problem with connectors and also the fuses. A proper hardwired soldered connecting is much better for the stator than a plug connection because of corrosion buildup.Its the heart of the electrical system along with the battery. Do the fix and save the stator.So many have said the same thing,the plug connections
get corroded.Get the connections soldered and avert this problem.

Robert
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ok I guess thats what im asking after all. All the guys that are telling me they bought their 1200s new and didnt lose the stator all hardwired the bike before any stator problems.
This bike far as I can tell has been hardwired already. If theres a part of it that isnt i will after this week. Will hard wiring the bike stop the stator melt down that usually happens? If this thing was an evo harley on back id know what to do to bullet proof it but the goldwing is a new beast to me.
So guess the question is has anyone hardwired a 1200 before the connections started melting down and did that stop the stator problem or did you lose it anyway?? Thanks for the patientence guys but i ride hard and three thousand miles in a month isnt unusal for me to put on a bike regularly. Even in the winter months as long as there is not snow or ice on the roads. I need this bike to stand up to that sort of milage. Thanks again:):)
 

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Stator

Ghostrider, my 85 LTD has its original stator and 75,000 miles.
The previous owner was a Finning HD mechanic and knew his stuff.
He did the hardwiring by soldering the wires together that come out of the stator and eliminating the plug connections. He explained what happens and why the connections needed to be soldered to make a strong but also solid electical connection that is not subject to moisture and corrosion.He also said he's told every
GW owner he sees with those plug connections to get them soldered or suffer a stator loss sooner or later. Almost every one of them he inspected for other guys showed telltail signs of corrosion,some more some less. I am a licensed radio operator myself and familiar with electronics and electrical circuits, its quite obvious to me about this problem. Hope this helps.

Robert
 

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Is hard wiring this connection the only one that needs to be done to help save my st

Ghostrider, my 85 LTD has its original stator and 75,000 miles.
The previous owner was a Finning HD mechanic and knew his stuff.
He did the hardwiring by soldering the wires together that come out of the stator and eliminating the plug connections. He explained what happens and why the connections needed to be soldered to make a strong but also solid electical connection that is not subject to moisture and corrosion.He also said he's told every
GW owner he sees with those plug connections to get them soldered or suffer a stator loss sooner or later. Almost every one of them he inspected for other guys showed telltail signs of corrosion,some more some less. I am a licensed radio operator myself and familiar with electronics and electrical circuits, its quite obvious to me about this problem. Hope this helps.

Robert
is hard wiring this connection the only one I need to do to help with longgevity of my stator on my 85 aspencade with 35,000 miles on it
 

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The stator wires are the ones you need to be concerned with.The stator being the heart of the electrical system must supply the correct voltage and amperage,if the wires
corrode and the amperage is'nt able to be supplied to the component parts heat starts to build up. The corroded wires act similar to a short,its not a short but the stator never the less heats up and thats when parts in the stator begin to fail.
There is two types of conections with wiring, a physical connection and an electrical connection,Just because it looks like a good physical connection that does'nt mean its a good electrical connection.In this case soldering the wires makes a good electrical connection first and the physical connection is a given.

Robert
 

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Hardwiring is the way to go. The connectors want to attract corrosion, then they run hot because of the corrosion. The heat comes from resistance - makes the alternator work harder. Harwired my '84 and my '86, and had no stator problems, even when running strobe lights while escorting funeral processions.
 

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Stator hard wire

Because I am putting some Additional driving lights on my 85 Wing I was concerned about Stator issues that I have heard about. I CHECKED MY CONNECTION AND I COULD NOT BELIEVE THE BIKE STILL RAN, THE CONNECTION WAS SO CORRODED AND OVER HEATED I WAS SHOCKED!!!
THOSE OF YOU WHO HAVE NOT CHECKED YOUR CONNECTION FROM THE STATOR DO SO IMMEDIATELY AND HARD WIRE IT.

THANK YOU TO THOSE WHO SUGGESTED THIS TO ME.
 

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One more fix I'm going to do on my 85 LTD is change out the 1156 and 1157 bulbs to LED's and put a load resistor in parallel with the left and right turnsignals.The 10 ohm 10 watt resistors are load balancers which the flasher unit needs to see or it won't flash because the LED's are next to no load. Doing this will lighten (excuse the pun)the load draw on the Alternator.

-Robert-
 
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