Honda Goldwing Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Ran across an opportunity here recently to purchase a 1978 Honda cb750 super sport. The owner reports that there are issues with the carb.(cleaned/rebuilt) but that it currently runs. Front tire is new, back(?), new paint job, extra chain, extra gear plates, Honda emblems etc.

The bike has not been modified in any mechanical way. Not customized other than the seat and maybe the back brake light.

There are 3 high def. very close up photos of the bike that suggesting that the bike is very clean and taken care of.

The bike looks awesome!

Are there any quirks I need to know about concerning this year/model? I am a little worried that this thing looks so awesome and costs relatively little.

If this bike works great would it be an Ideal candidate for interstate travel?

thanks
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
26,270 Posts
'78 was the last year for the venerable OHC engine. Aside from the carbs, if there's still running issues, it could be valve adjustment, if memeory serves, they were screw adjustable valve and then the DOHC in '79 went to bucket and shim. My '75 was pretty solid in the valve train, but it took a steady hand to set the valves and get them perfect but my dealer's mechanic at the time (co-incidently the very one I work for now) was very patient and thorough. Cracks in the carb boots can cause tuning probs too, and sparkplug wires/cap-ends are suspect if they're not tip top.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
A candidate for interstate travel? Not likely, unless you have a cast iron butt since these stock seats are like riding on a board.
As far as the bike goes, the engines on these things are virtually bullet proof, and can go and go and go and still be cheap and easy to maintain. However, the latter years of the SUPER SPORT had issues with the valve guides wearing out quickly. This was due in part to the change HONDA made in the head design to accomodate the larger valves. After the '76 model, there were changes in the angle of the valves in the head which increased the side-loading of the valve stem when the rocker pushed down, and the guides got worn out. They also had the "COMSTAR" riveted wheels which were nice and light, but if they were subjected to corrosion, you'd be better off trashing them and finding something else.
Steve F
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top