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Discussion Starter #1
I bought an '88 Wing yesterday,:D As I was browsing through the owners manual I came to the specs about light bulbs. It says the headlight is 12V, 45/45:confused: Is this a misprint? Every other bulb I've seen is 45/55 for low/high beam. Or, is it that all 4 beams come on for high beams?:confused:
 

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As simply as I can put it.
Yes, both filaments in the bulb are the same lumen's(wattage).
When you are on low beams the lighted filament is "off focus" with the reflector surfaces on the housing and therefore is of lower perceived brightness and actually reflects off some facets that point the beam more down than the high beam reflector facets.
When you turn on the "brights" the 2nd filament lights and is "on focus" where it gets the maximum reflectance off the housing reflector surfaces providing the brighter/higher lumen's appearance.
Getting the proper beam patterns at the proper brightness to hit certain teat points per FMVSS(FederalMotorVehicle SafteyStandards) is a very involved design/testing process.
Probably at least 2 to 3 years from styling conception to a finished/produceable/legal end product for installation on a production vehicle. Also a rough investment of $3,000,000 on up of design, engineering, tooling cost just for the headlamp of a production/marketable vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the feedback..I kinda thought it might work that way...just making sure; On the other hand, if I replace the bulbs with 45/55...wouldn't that LIGHT things up that much better?
 

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Possible if the wiring will stand the load and the socket and housing will stand the heat.
The problem is the extra heat may cause the socket to out gas, which discolors/burns the reflector chrome surface. Starts directly above the bulb and spreads to larger and larger area on the reflector surface. In extreme cases the extra power of the higher bulb can cause wiring to overheat with bad results and melt the bulb socket!
Part of the FMVSS requirements is a heat test procedure. Most manufacturers do not add more cost to a product than is needed to pass requirements.
Maybe someone will respond that has put a 55 watt bulb in without any problems.
 

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Thanks fossil...that looks like a great alternative!:)
 

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Another BIG improvement is to upgrade the headlight assembly to the newer one. The early 1500's had a checkered looking headlight, l in 1998 they got a clear plastic headlight assembly.

Old headlight assembly

New headlight assembly
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Are they a direct fit without mods?
 

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I don't know if they are a direct fit, but my buddy with a 94 had an accident and had it replaced with the new type of lens. Much nicer in my opinion.
 

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I don't know if they are a direct fit, but my buddy with a 94 had an accident and had it replaced with the new type of lens. Much nicer in my opinion.
Just a note of clarification here.
One would need to replace the whole lamp, not just the lens.
1. Lens and housing are bonded together and are not usually serviceable as component parts.
2. The lamp w/the optics in the lens is how that legal lamp is designed. The lamp w/the clear lens has the required optical pattern on the housing reflector surface.
Besides not being legal, one would not be very happy at all w/the performance of an altered lamp that contained no optics on the lens nor on the housing!
 
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